A.E. Housman – ‘Bredon Hill’


[  No.69 of my favourite short poems  ]

BredonHill1991

‘On Bredon Hill’ . . .  Sketch – WHB: 1991

Bredon Hill is in Worcestershire, England, in the Vale of Evesham.  This poem of A.E. Housman’s, which he called ‘Bredon Hill’, is taken from his collection of poems, ‘A Shropshire Lad’ published in 1896.

Housman (1859-1936) was an English poet and scholar, whose verse exerted a strong influence on later poets.  The tone of this particular poem shows a preoccupation with loss and, as such, mirrors the tone of many of his poems.   It tells of lost love, contrasting powerfully the ‘happy noise’ of the church bells which brought joy and happy memories of youthful exuberence at the start of the poem, with the single tone of the funeral bell with which the poem ends.

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Bredon Hill    (From “A Shropshire Lad”)

by A.E. Housman

In summertime on Bredon 
The bells they sound so clear; 
Round both the shires they ring them 
In steeples far and near, 
A happy noise to hear. 

Here of a Sunday morning 
My love and I would lie, 
And see the coloured counties, 
And hear the larks so high 
About us in the sky.

The bells would ring to call her 
In valleys miles away; 
“Come all to church, good people; 
Good people come and pray.” 
But here my love would stay. 

And I would turn and answer 
Among the springing thyme, 
“Oh, peal upon our wedding, 
And we will hear the chime, 
And come to church in time.”

But when the snows at Christmas 
On Bredon top were strown, 
My love rose up so early 
And stole out unbeknown 
And went to church alone.

They tolled the one bell only, 
Groom there was none to see, 
The mourners followed after, 
And so to church went she, 
And would not wait for me. 

The bells they sound on Bredon, 
And still the steeples hum, 
“Come all to church, good people,” 
Oh, noisy bells, be dumb; 
I hear you, I will come.

 

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8 thoughts on “A.E. Housman – ‘Bredon Hill’

  1. Thanks for introducing this poem by Houseman. It starts out so romantic and beautiful but with a great stillness about it. Suddenly we meet the loss and dark by just two lines…
    ” They tolled the one bell only,
    Groom there were none to see”
    Here we know it is not going to end well. Such sadness.

    Reading up a bit I find that most of his were filled with sadness but then he lived through the
    First World War.
    As to Wrekin Hill I came across this verse:
    “On Wenlock Edge the wood’s in trouble;
    His forest fleece the Wrekin heaves;
    The gale, it plies the saplings double,
    And thick on Severn snow the leaves.”

    You do get me studying and learning more about the English poets. I love it.
    Miriam

    Liked by 2 people

  2. A great poem and share to start the week Roland. Houseman’s poem have such depth and you need to sit and study them over time to fully appreciate them. There is an excellent book by Peter Parker called Houseman Country: Into the heart of England, which is worth a read, if you haven’t already done so.

    Liked by 1 person

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