Cadiz

 [ Photo Gallery # 93 ]

Cadiz – Spain

Cádiz is a city and port in south-western Spain. It is the capital of the Province of Cádiz, one of eight which make up the autonomous community of Andalusia.  In my Photo Gallery today I include just a selection of the photographs which I took whilst wandering around the city on a visit there in 2006.

There are narrow streets, beautiful tree-lined plazas, a magnificent seafront promenade adorned with wonderful fountains, paved with colourful majolica tiles, and surrounded by a variety of trees and flowers.  Alameda Apodaca is a beautiful spot in the city of Cadiz, ideal for a stroll and to cool down on hot summer days.  It is a broad avenue with cobbled streets, and a variety of cobblestones and majolica tiles forming geometrical designs.

 

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View of the city from the sea with Cadiz Cathedral dominating the skyline

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Monument of the Spanish Constitution (approved in 1812)

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Blossoming Jacaranda tree

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Arbol del Mora, giant Moreton Bay Fig Trees (Ficus macrophylla) planted around 1900

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Fountain and tiled majolica paving in the Alameda Apodaca

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In Park Genoves

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In the amazing Park Genoves, a botanical wonderland filled with over 100 species of trees and shrubs

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 On one of Cadiz beaches, below the statue bust of Paco Alba, composer and creator of the  Carnival comparsa of Cádiz.

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A Cadiz Roofscape

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Cadiz street entertainment

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RYE, East Sussex, England

[ Photo Gallery # 90 ]

RYE is an English town near the coast in East Sussex.  It was one of the original Cinque Ports and parts of the original walls and town gates, once built to guard against invasions from the French, still remain.  Over the centuries, however, the sea has receded leaving Rye Harbour and the coast of the English Channel about 2 miles (3.2 km) downriver from the town.  In the town centre, cobbled lanes like Mermaid Street still exist lined with medieval, half-timbered houses. The redbrick Lamb House was once owned by writer Henry James. Nearby, the tower of the Norman St. Mary’s Church overlooks the town. 

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Low tide on the River Rother at Rye

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Ancient Rye Mill, reconstructed in 1932 after a fire destroyed much of the superstructure

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Fascinating weather-worn textures in part of the ancient town walls

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Looking uphill along the cobbled Mermaid Street to Lamb House at the top right

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View across the roofs of the town from the roof of St. Mary’s Church tower

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Another view across the roofs of the town from the roof of St. Mary’s Church tower

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View towards the River Rother from the roof of St. Mary’s Church tower

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A Burne-Jones stained-glass window in St.Mary’s Church

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A lovely corner window in the town

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House front near St.Mary’s Church

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One of the ancient town entry gates

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The green plaque is inscribed ‘Radclyffe Hall (1880 – 1943), Novelist, lived here.’

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London

[ Photo Gallery # 88 }

A few of my photographic memories of a stroll through central London and the City on a beautiful warm summer’s day in 2005. 

 

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Looking upriver from Waterloo Bridge towards Big Ben, the London Eye and the Houses of Parliament

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Looking down-river from Waterloo Bridge towards St.Paul’s Cathedral and the City

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View  of St.Paul’s Cathedral across the River Thames from the top of the Tate Modern Gallery

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The dome of St.Paul’s Cathedral looking north across the Millennium Footbridge

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The dome of St.Paul’s Cathedral looking north across the Millennium Footbridge – 2

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View to the east from the Millennium Footbridge towards Tower Bridge

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Street entertainer on the South Embankment of the Thames – Waterloo Bridge in the background

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Office block in the City

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London Guildhall – exterior

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London Guildhall – interior – the excavated remains of the Roman Amphitheatre discovered beneath the foundations of the Guildhall.

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Bath – The Kennet & Avon Canal

[ Photo Gallery # 85 }

Following my series of photographs of Bath on my last week’s photo-blog, I today feature a number of photographs centring on Bath’s position on the beautiful River Avon and its associated canal – the Kennet and Avon.  

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Town Bridge at Bradford-on-Avon, approximately seven miles from the city of Bath

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The Bridge Tearooms, Bradford-on-Avon

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The City of Bath

[ Photo Gallery # 84 }

Bath

Bath is the largest city in the ceremonial county of Somerset, England.  It is renowned in particular for its Roman spa baths, built c. 60 AD, when it went under the Latin name of Aquae Sulis (‘The Waters of Sulis’).   In 2011, the city had a population of almost 89 thousand.

Bath is in the valley of the River Avon, 97 miles (156 km) west of London.  The town is set in the rolling countryside of south-west England, and is known for its natural hot springs and 18th-century Georgian architecture.  It has strong connections with the 18th Century author, Jane Austen, who lived here during the Regency period from 1801 to 1806 and who set two of her novels, ‘Northanger Abbey’ and ‘Persuasion’, in Bath.

Honey-coloured Bath stone has been used extensively in the town’s architecture, including at Bath Abbey, noted for its fan-vaulting, tower and large stained-glass windows. The museum at the site of the original Roman-era Baths includes The Great Bath, statues and a temple.

In 1704, Richard (‘Beau’) Nash, the celebrated leader of fashion, became ‘Master of Ceremonies’ at the then rising spa town of  Bath.  He lived in the town for much of the first part of the 18th Century and played a leading role in making Bath the most fashionable resort in 18th-century England.

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I hope my gallery of photographs, taken in Bath on a visit to the city about 12 years ago, will give a taste of the pleasures and architectural delights of this city, one of the most visited in the United Kingdom.

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The River Avon and Pulteney Bridge at Bath. Designed by Robert Adam in a Palladian style, it is exceptional in having shops built across its full span on both sides. 

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The Avon Weir, beside Pulteney Bridge

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Close-up of the Avon Weir

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A more distant view of Pulteney Bridge and the Avon Weir

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Statue of Mozart in the Parade Gardens, Grand Parade, BATH

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View of the East window of Bath Abbey from the Parade Gardens

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Fan vaulting on the nave of Bath Abbey

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Close-up of the nave ceiling at Bath Abbey

 

 

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Memorial to Sir Richard Hussey Bickerton (1759-1832) in Bath Abbey.  He was a British naval officer, at times, second in command to Lord Nelson

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The Great Bath – the entire structure above the level of the pillar bases is a later construction. There are four main features to the complex: the Sacred Spring, the Roman Temple, the Roman Bath House and the museum

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The Spring rises within the courtyard of the Temple of Sulis Minerva and water from it feeds the Roman Baths

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Sally Lunn’s is much more than a world famous tea and eating house in the centre of Bath.  This historic building is one of the oldest houses in the city.  It owes its fame to the creation of the first Bath bun, an authentic regional speciality known throughout the world, and first introduced by the legendary young Huguenot baker, Sally Lunn, in Georgian Bath.

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Oslo, NORWAY

[ Photo Gallery # 83 }

OSLO, the capital of Norway, is a beautiful city.  I published a previous blog – ‘Oslo Statuary’  (q.v.) in November of 2016 in which I sang the praises of this fine city and displayed photographs of a few of the many statues dotted around the harbour and the city centre.

I am including below more photographs taken in and around the city during my visit there in 2004.

My first photograph, to set the Scandinavian theme, is of a troll, well possibly a gnome – not sure I can tell the difference. Trolls can be found everywhere and anywhere in Norway.  They are deeply woven into Norwegian culture, and, when in Oslo,  you don’t have to go far to find them.  They can be found in great numbers in every tourist shop – miniatures, books, calendars, t-shirts and other fabric designs dedicated to these fantasy beings.   It is apparent that Trolls come in all shapes and sizes; immense mountain trolls; moss covered forest trolls; terrifying three headed trolls and mischievous, gnome-like trolls.  Many shops have a troll statue standing by the entrance and are regularly incorporated in selfies.

 

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A shop-front Troll ready for a skiing session

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The sea approach to Oslo is by way of  the Inner Oslo Fjord

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Akerhus Fortress or Castle stands beside the main harbour.  It is a medieval castle that was built to protect Oslo from invasion. It has also been used as a royal residential palace and as a prison.

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Looking from the Korketrekkeren towards the sea approach to Oslo along the Inner Oslo Fjord

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This is ski jumping hill Holmenkollen.  Close by is the Korketrekkeren, a former bobsleigh and luge track in Oslo.  It is operated as a public venue by the municipality.  It is possible to rent out sleds and try your hand at the skislopes, just a short distance outside the city .

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I certainly wouldn’t dare!

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. . . although he obviously would – and did!

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King Olaf V of Norway, 1957-1991, and his dog Troll. This monument is placed near ski jumping hill at Holmenkollen.  The monument is called “Skiglede” or “Love Skiing”

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Street artists plying their trade in the city centre

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Street puppeteer (Reminds me of the one at Whitby I included in my photographs a few weeks ago).

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One of Oslo’s many city centre living statue performers

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Not another living statue this time – just one of the many harbour-side statues. 

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Another of the many harbour-side statues – this one, somewhat like Atlas, balances a cruise ship on what remains of its head.

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Gotland, Sweden

[ Photo Gallery # 82 }

Gotland is Sweden’s largest island.  It is (approximately) 176 km (109 miles) by 52 km (32 miles), with a coastline of c. 800 km (500 miles) and a population of round about 58,003,  over 23,000 of whom live in Visby, the island’s main town.  The island has had a long and colourful history, due in large measure to its strategic position in the Baltic Sea.  Gotland’s main activities today centre around agriculture, food processing, tourism, and information technology services.  There is a small amount of heavy industry, particularly associated with concrete production from limestone which is mined on the island.

My photographs below were taken on a visit to the island in 2004.

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Gotland’s position on the Baltic Sea

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View across the roofs of Visby towards the Baltic Sea, with the ruins of the Saint Catherine church on the left. 

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View towards the Cathedral in Visby

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Visby Cathedral, now known as St. Mary’s Church

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View of Visby Cathedral’s towers from outside the city wall

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On the Baltic shore near Visby

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Interior of a reconstructed Viking Longhouse on Gotland

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Further view of the Interior of a reconstructed Viking Longhouse on Gotland

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Västerhejde Church on Gotland

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The Iron Age Stone Ship burial place at Gnisvärd.   Such stone ships are burial places for the chieftain of a village, built of many large stones, placed in the shape of a ship. The persons remains are cremated in a large bonfire and then placed in a vessel in the centre of the stone ship.  This one at Gnisvärd is Gotland’s second largest ship at 45 metres in length

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Another view of the Iron Age Stone Ship burial place at Gnisvärd. 

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RIGA – LATVIA

[ Photo Gallery # 81 ]

‘Riga, Latvia’s capital, is set on the Baltic Sea at the mouth of the River Daugava. It is considered a cultural centre and is home to many museums and concert halls. The city is also known for its wooden buildings, art nouveau architecture and medieval Old Town. The pedestrian-only Old Town has many shops and restaurants and is home to busy Livu Square, with bars and nightclubs.’  Wikipedia.


On a visit to Latvia in 2006 I was able to spend a day wandering around its beautiful capital city of Riga.  I include a selection of my photographs below . . .

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At the harbour entrance to Riga

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Entering Riga via the mouth of the River Daugava

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The Vanšu cable-stayed Bridge over the Daugava River 

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Statue at the entrance to the sea terminal – The ‘Symbol of the Founding of Riga in 1201’

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Riga’s ‘Freedom Statue’

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Riga’s ‘Freedom Statue’ – close up view

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Riga’s Antenna Aerial Communications Tower

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St Peter’s Lutheran Church

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View of Riga from the river – The Dome Cathedral on the right

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Riga Castle – Official residence of the Latvian President

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The Red Riflemen Monument: ‘In the centre of Old Riga stands a controversial red granite statue that was originally dedicated to the Latvian Red Riflemen, some of whom became Lenin’s personal bodyguards. Some view the monument as a symbol of the old communist system and would love to tear it down. Others believe it’s a necessary tribute to Latvians who fought in the early years of WWI. It now honours all Latvian riflemen, both Whites and Reds. Politics aside, it’s an impressive monument.’ (The background history of this statue is reproduced from http://www.inyourpocket.com/riga )

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St Peter’s Church and spire

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Livu Square in Riga’s Old Town

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Entrance to Euro Park – for motor cars

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Art nouveau caryatids on the façade of one of Riga’s many such buildings

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North Yorkshire Coast #2

[ Photo Gallery # 79 ]

Moving further along the North Sea coast of Yorkshire from the scenes of the villages north of Whitby in my previous Photo Gallery ( # 78), I post below just a selection of my photographs of two seaside towns, Saltburn and Redcar.

Both were and still are holiday resorts, once much more popular as such than they are today.   Both still maintain a small, if much diminished, fishing fleet and still do their utmost to attract visitors.  Their great glory is the beautiful 8 mile long beach, one of the longest unbroken stretches in the United Kingdom, running from South Gare, at the mouth of the River Tees, southwards, along the seafront of Redcar, past Marske-by-the-Sea, to Huntcliffe at Saltburn.

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SALTBURN: Huntcliffe,Cat Nab & the Ship Inn.

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SALTBURN: The view south from the entrance to the funicular cliff railway and Huntcliffe,

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Saltburn is one of the original centres of the north-east surfing scene

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The funicular railway at Saltburn began operating in 1884 and is the oldest operating water-balance cliff lift in the United Kingdom.

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A misty view upwards showing the balanced ascending and descending carriages

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Saltburn pier, first opened in 1869, is now the last pier remaining in Yorkshire.  It has itself been frequently damaged in the past by North Sea storms, but remains a popular attraction.

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View from the pier southwards to Huntcliffe

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Saltburn Pier – looking due East to the North Sea

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The view to sea from REDCAR.  Not what I had expected to see, 10 years after my previous visit!

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REDCAR: Wind Turbines – now detracting from the view of the North Sea

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Even the re-designed and modern seafront promenade now has wind turbines as a backdrop

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REDCAR  . . .  and the fishing boats now have these to contend with too!

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REDCAR BEACON:  Now sporting  a seafront helter-skelter – Sorry, NO, it is apparently a Vertical Pier, with its own restaurant and giving beautiful views along the Yorkshire coastline. 

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REDCAR:  . . . and sand sculptures to enhance the view!?

 

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Whitby #3

[ Photo Gallery # 77 ]

A further (last – for the time being anyway) selection of my photographs of Whitby taken on my frequent visits there  in the past . . .

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Whitby – as the River Esk enters the North Sea – view from East Cliff

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Harbour Entrance   1

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Harbour Entrance 2

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Harbour Entrance 3

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The ruins of Whitby Abbey atop East Cliff

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Whitby Town – view from the top of the 199 Steps

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Caedmon’s Cross and Whitby Town – View from the Churchyard of St.Mary’s 

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Old gravestones in the churchyard – a prominent setting for Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ story.

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A Weathered Gravestone

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By the entrance to the church – Memorial to John Storr, the Coxwain of the Whitby lifeboat, and eleven others who lost their lives on the lifeboat in 1861.

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A modern day street puppeteer with organ grinder on the Whitby harbour-side

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