Ireland – The Dingle Peninsula

 [ Photo Blog #57 ] 

Following on from the photographs of my visit to Killarney and the Mulcross Estate, today’s tour is of the Dingle Peninsular, one of the 3 promontories which jut out into the Atlantic Ocean from the south-west coast of Ireland.
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Map of South West Ireland showing the Dingle Peninsula

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Beach along the southern coast of the Peninsula

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Further along the southern coast with a view to the outlying islands

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Looking eastwards back towards Dingle

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One of the Dingle Peninsula’s many small secluded beaches

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The Dingle Peninsula has many dozens of standing stones such as this menhir beside the coast road.

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. . .  and this menhir further along the coast

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The roadside remains of a one-time occupied croft

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Dingle Slea Head Crucifix – one of many such roadside shrines

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Seagull on the seawall with the Blasket Islands behind

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Sea thrift beside the coast road

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Roadside wild foxgloves at the south-western end of the peninsula

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Northumberland – Bamburgh

[ Photo Blog #56 ]

The coast of Northumbria on the North-East of England bordering with Scotland is atmospheric and highly impressive.  It was described by Janet Street Porter on ITV’s ‘Britain’s Best View’ as having ‘a coastline ravaged by nature and steeped in history.  There’s a story round every single corner … you’re not just looking at a view, you’re standing in the footsteps of kings, and all on one of the most dramatic coastlines nature has to offer.’ 

Bamburgh Map

I have visited many times, usually on the way to or from my tours of Scotland.  For me, one of the highlights of a visit to this part of the country is the small town of BAMBURGH. The following photographs I took there in 2003 on one of these visits when I stayed in this historic town for several days.

Bamburgh is a stunningly attractive small town within the Northumberland Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.   In fact it is even perhaps just a village, with a population of only about  450.  It is dominated by its magnificently imposing Castle, once the seat of the former Kings of Northumbria, that can be seen for miles around.  It would be hard not to be impressed by the sheer size of the Castle and there is so much to tell about its long and amazing history.  On the seaward side of the castle and town there are impressive stretches of pure golden sandy beaches with rolling sand dunes and views across the sea to both the Holy Island of Lindisfarne and to the Farne Islands.   The town also houses a museum dedicated to its great heroine, Grace Darling.

To read the story of Grace Darling and of how her heroism caught the attention of the Victorian public, click on this link . . .   The Story Of Grace Darling

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Bamburgh Castle from the North Sea shore

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Looking eastwards towards the castle from the town

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The defensive landward side walls of Bamburgh Castle in the evening sun

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The seaward walls of Bamburgh Castle from the seashore

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Looking north to the castle across the coastline dunes

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The beach of the North Sea at Bamburgh

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Looking eastwards across the North Sea from the sand dunes

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Driftwood marker on Bamburgh beach

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The Bamburgh Sandman (See my earlier blog of October 29th 2016 at: The SANDMAN   )

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This elaborate cenotaph commemorates the life of the early 19th Century lifeboat heroine, Grace Darling, who is buried nearby.

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Bamburgh rooftops and castle battlements outlined against the rising sun

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The Castle at Sunrise 

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Sunrise over the North Sea from Bamburgh

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Bamburgh Castle . . . Pen and Wash – WHB:  2014   ©

 

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The Isle Of Wight

[ Photo Blog #54 ]

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A photographic trip today to England’s delightful off-shore Isle of Wight, set, at its shortest distance, just 3 miles off the southern coast in the English Channel.    In size, the island is approximately 25 by 13 miles, and had a population in 2010 of 140,500.   The photographs below were taken by me some while ago – during the lovely summer of 2003.
The island is known particularly for its beaches and seafront promenades such as those at Ryde, Shanklin, Sandown and south-facing Ventnor.  Dinosaur remains and fossils have been found in several areas.  At the island’s westernmost point, The Needles are 3 huge, white chalk rocks, with a nearby 19th-century lighthouse positioned to warn approaching shipping.

 

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Alum Bay … The cliff chair lift sets off for the beach

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. . . approaching the cliff top

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. . . descending to the beach

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. . . where it ends on a jetty extending into the sea.

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The Needles from the cliffs above Alum Bay

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A closer view of The Needles and the Lighthouse

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The Beach and Battery Inn at Seaview on the island’s East Coast

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Outside the Battery Inn

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Seafront chalets at Puckpool near Ryde 

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The axeman earns his keep at the Waxworks at Brading – now, I believe, closed.

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Queen Victoria’s holiday escape – Osborne House on the island’s east coast.

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View from Osborne House eastwards to the Solent

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On the south-facing beach at Ventnor

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Blackgang Chine – an area subject to frequent coastal erosion.

 

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Killarney

[ Photo Blog #54 ]

One of the highlights of my visit to the South West of Ireland in 2003 was a tour by horse-drawn Jaunting (or jaunty) Car of Killarney’s Muckross House and gardens and of the world famous Killarney National Park and its lakes and mountains.

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A still extant relic of the reign of Queen Victoria

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This nineteenth century Victorian mansion is set against the stunning beauty of Killarney National Park.

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The jaunty car taxi rank

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By Killarney’s Lakes and Fells

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A pause to take in the view

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The Ruins of Killegy Chapel

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In the graveyard of Killegy Chapel

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Wild flowers in the Graveyard overlooking the lake

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Tree growing inside the roofless nave of the chapel

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The roofless chapel

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Close-up view of a memorial – now open to the sky.

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Return to Mucross House

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North Cape – Nordkapp

[ Photo Blog #52 ]

Nordkapp (English: North Cape) is in Finnmark County of Norway.  It was long claimed as the northernmost point of the continent of Europe. In fact it is the furthest north that one can drive in Europe but, by less than a mile, it is not quite the most northerly point.  The administrative centre of the area is in the town of Honningsvag, where the local population is approximately 3,500.   Nordkapp is a splendid spot, weather permitting, from which to see the midnight sun.  It is normal for about 200,000 tourists to  visit there annually during the two to three months of summer,  the main tourist attraction being the splendid views from the North Cape itself.  The North Cape first became famous when the English explorer Richard Chancellor sailed round it in 1553 while attempting to find a sea route through the North-east Passage. Except for the first photograph, the photographs are from my own visit there in 2002. 

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North Cape itself

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Approaching Honningsvag from the sea

 

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Honningsvag – town and harbour

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Traditional reindeer hide tent – set up for the tourists 

 

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Reindeer and boy in traditional costume

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Reindeer

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View of the summit of Nordkapp

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The summit of the cape has a number of sculptures and statues.

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Pointing towards the North Pole

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Signpost giving the Cape’s coordinates

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View from the Cape to the west

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View north towards Svalbard and the North Pole

Scotland – 4 Lochs in the Southern Highlands

[ Photo Blog #51 ]

Mainland Scotland has 6,160 miles (9,910 km) of coastline.  Including the numerous islands, this increases to some 10,250 miles (16,500 km).  The west coast in particular is heavily indented, with long promontories separated by fjord-like sea lochs.  In addition to these, there are more than 30,000 freshwater lochs in Scotland.  I give below a selection containing a dozen of my photographs, taken in 2001, of just four of these inland lochs – Loch Earn, Loch Fyne, Loch Lawyers and Loch Voil – all in the southern reaches of the Western Highlands . . . 

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Loch Earn – from Achray House

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Sunrise on Lock Earn – 1

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Sunrise on Loch Earn -2

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Sunrise on Loch Earn – 3

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Sunset on Loch Earn

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Loch Fyne – towards Inverary

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Loch Fyne – 2

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Loch Fyne – 3

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Loch Lawyers

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Loch Voil 1

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Loch Voil – 2

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Loch Voil – 3

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Structure – ‘Daily Post’ Photo Challenge

Structure

In response to the recent ‘Daily Post’ PHOTO CHALLENGE,  outlined as follows . . .

“Today, take a moment to notice the structure of everyday things around you. Note the lines, freckles, and tiny hairs on your arm, and imagine the biological blueprint that created them. See the bricks of a building, and realize that they were individually placed there by another person. Then, share with us a photo of the structure of something wonderful. We’re eager to see details through your lens.”

I submit the following two of my photographs of a scanned leaf skeleton, taken some while ago …

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Leaf Skeleton – Photo WHB  ©

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Bruges, Belgium

[ Photo Blog #50 ]

I paid the first of my two visits to this delightful city, the capital of West Flanders, in north-west Belgium in 2003.  As will be seen from the photographs, the weather was not particularly kind during my visit, but the rain stopped long enough to enable me to take the following photographs . . .

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The Belfry is a medieval bell tower in the centre of Bruges

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The West Flanders Provincial Court

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Part of the Provincial Palace, Market Square

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The canals of Bruges are part of the personality of the city. 

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The city’s canals are one of the main attractions in Bruges 

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Navigating through the canals and discovering the most hidden corners of Bruges is essential to enjoying the essence of the city.

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The city has become known as the “Venice of the North”

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Canal artist at work

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Diverse statuary can be seen all over the city

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Bruges is famous for its lace-making and has many shops selling hand-made lace items.  In many streets lace-makers can be watched using their skills to create beautiful silkware.

 

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River Thames Sunsets

A selection of my photographs, taken on different occasions between 2004 and 2010, of sunsets – looking westwards from the south bank of the River Thames along the four mile stretch of the River in Surrey, England, between Chertsey and Walton-on-Thames . . .

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The Lake District

[ Photo Blog #48 ]

England, Cumbria, The Lake District

Never far from water in the Lake District

My photographs, taken several years ago on what would now be considered to be an old camera

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Ambleside Pierhead on Lake Windermere

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Evening at Ambleside Pierhead on Lake Windermere

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Bridge crossing the River Derwent in Borrowdale

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The Landing Jetty and Coniston Launch at Brantwood on Coniston Water

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On Buttermere

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The ‘Sentinels’ on Buttermere, the Lake District’s most photographed trees.

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The Steam Yacht on Coniston Water

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Derwentwater at Keswick

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Thirlmere

10SkelwithForce

Skelwith Force

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Autumn colours near Skelwith Bridge, Ambleside