Telling FIBS

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TELLING  FIBS

This
Life
Is short
Remember
Honest and modest
You’re not in a beauty contest.

So
When
I’m gone
Do not pray
For my godliness
Just remember my gentleness.

If
I
Survive
To be old
One hundred and five
I hope it’s worth being alive.

But
It
Only
Merits it
If you are still there
To continue our love affair.

I am grateful to M.Zane McClellan who in his January 2016 poem  ‘Repeating Pattern’  on The Poetry Channel, introduced me to The format of the Fibonacci Poem. He also gave in his blog the reference to the article on the ‘Poetry Foundation’ website, which gives the history of this fascinating verse format:  What’s a Fib? Math plus poetry.

Essentially the ‘Fib’, as it’s creator, Gregory K. Pincus, calls it, will have 20 syllables in total, with the syllables in each of the 6 lines increasing in the Fibonacci sequence familiar in Mathematics and in Nature, that is: 1,1,2,3,5,8…  ,

In my first attempt at this format, I have attempted to write a poem of 4 connected verses, with the added feature of making the last two lines in each verse rhyme.

Telling More Fibs

Fibonacci poetry, or FIB VERSE, was founded by Gregory K. Pincus as a 6-line poem that follows the Fibonacci sequence for syllable count per line.
For the 6-line poem that means:

1 syllable for first line
1 syllable for second line
2 syllables for third
3 syllables for fourth
5 syllables for fifth
8 syllables for sixth


*****

Here are two more examples of my own attempts to compose FIB VERSE . . .

( I have published previous examples of FIB VERSE which you can find by typing ‘Fibs’ into the SEARCH BAR on this blog’ )

TELLING FIBS … #3. CARPE DIEM
Here
Now
Today
Grasp the chance
Say ‘Carpe Diem’
Seize this new day with fortitude

TELLING FIBS…. #4
Look
Learn
Be wise
Hold to Truth
Never embroider
For the truth will bring you freedom



Telling Fibs

Fibonacci poetry, or FIB VERSE, was founded by Gregory K. Pincus as a 6-line poem that follows the Fibonacci sequence for syllable count per line.
For the 6-line poem that means:

1 syllable for first line
1 syllable for second line
2 syllables for third
3 syllables for fourth
5 syllables for fifth
8 syllables for sixth


*****

Here are two examples of my own attempts to compose FIB VERSE . . .

( I have published previous examples of FIB VERSE which you can find by typing ‘Fibs’ into the SEARCH BAR on this blog’ )

TELLING FIBS . . .  #1. FUN


I
Me
We are
Full of fun
Trying new verse forms
Why not join me and attempt this?



TELLING FIBS … #2. TOGETHERNESS


Yes
We
Belong
Together
Forever a pair
Our destiny coupled in love

‘Truth and the Past’ … Three Fibs

fib series

Poets have experimented with poetic form for as long as poetry has existed.  One of the most recent exercises in poetic form utilises the mathematics of the Fibonacci sequence and was introduced in recent years by the American author, Gregory K. Pincus.    Such poems or verses are often termed ‘FIBS’.

What is a Fib?

‘ The Fibonacci poem is a poetry form based on the structure of the Fibonacci number sequence. For those unfamiliar with the Fibonacci Sequence, it is a mathematical sequence in which every figure is the sum of the two preceding it. Thus, you begin with 1 and the sequence follows as such: 1+1=2; then in turn 1+2=3; then 2+3=5; then 3+5=8 and so on. The poetry sequence therefore consists of lines of 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, and so on with each number representing the number of syllables or words that a writer places in each line of the poem. As a literary device, it is used as a formatted pattern in which one can offer meaning in any organized way, providing the number sequence remains the constancy of the form.   The subject of the Fibonacci poem has no restriction, but the difference between a good fib and a great fib is the poetic element that speaks to the reader.’   This description of the form is quoted from:  http://www.musepiepress.com/fibreview/

I give three of my own attempts at this poetic form below . . .

scroll2

 

When

At

The end

of our days

We review our past

Let us not wish to deny it

 

sline6

 

Stay

Think

Resolve

To recount

In all honesty

Only what is valid and true

When at last we make the journey to meet our maker

 

sline6

 

Speak,

Now,

To me,

my poet,

Of your love for me,

In melodious soothing words,

To nourish the feelings which I long to hear you say.

 

sline6

TELLING FIBS

 

fibonacci8a

Fibonacci in Nature … Photo  WHB – 2017

TELLING  FIBS

This
Life
Is short
Remember
Honest and modest
You’re not in a beauty contest.

So
When
I’m gone
Do not pray
For my godliness
Just remember my gentleness.

If
I
Survive
To be old
One hundred and five
I hope it’s worth being alive.

But
It
Only
Merits it
If you are still there
To continue our love affair.

banner-rose

I am grateful to M.Zane McClellan who in his recent poem ‘Repeating Pattern’  on The Poetry Channel on 4th January 2016, introduced me to the format of the Fibonacci Poem. He also gave in his blog the reference to the article on the ‘Poetry Foundation’ website, which gives the history of this fascinating verse format:  What’s a Fib? Math plus poetry.
Essentially the ‘Fib’, as it’s creator, Gregory K. Pincus, calls it, will have 20 syllables in total, with the syllables in each of the 6 lines increasing in the Fibonacci sequence familiar in Mathematics and in Nature, that is: 1,1,2,3,5,8…  ,
In my first attempt at this format, I have attempted to write a poem of 4 connected verses, with the added feature of making the last two lines in each verse rhyme.

divider-roses