Scotland – The Fife Coast: 2

[ Photo Gallery # 97 ]

The Fife Coast: 2

Elie, Anstruther, Crail, & Fife Ness

 

Continuing my journey along the Scottish East Coast, my Photo Gallery today displays more views of some of the delightful coastal villages along this  seaboard. . .

Scotland07 002 Fife-Elie

Elie is a small coastal town and former royal burgh in Fife, on the north coast of the Firth of Forth.

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The shoreline and jetty at Elie

Scotland07 020 Fife-Anstrthr

Anstruther is a small town in Fife, Scotland, nine miles south-southeast of St. Andrews. The two halves of the town are divided by a stream, known as the Dreel Burn.

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The harbour at Anstruther

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View seawards to the harbour entrance at Anstruther

Scotland07 029 Fife-Crail

 The stout harbour wall at Crail, a former royal burgh in the East Neuk of Fife.

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A gull’s nest viewed from the cliffs at Crail

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The harbour at Crail

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Two views from Fife Ness, a headland forming the most eastern point in Fife

Scotland07 055 FifeNess

 

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Malaga – SPAIN

 [ Photo Gallery # 95 ]

Málaga is a port city on southern Spain’s Costa del Sol, known for its high-rise hotels and resorts jutting up from yellow-sand beaches.  The photographs below were taken by me on a visit to the city in 2006 . . .

( Click on any photograph to open an enlarged view; click again to move on through the remaining enlarged photographs )

 

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Whitby #3

[ Photo Gallery # 77 ]

A further (last – for the time being anyway) selection of my photographs of Whitby taken on my frequent visits there  in the past . . .

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Whitby – as the River Esk enters the North Sea – view from East Cliff

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Harbour Entrance   1

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Harbour Entrance 2

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Harbour Entrance 3

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The ruins of Whitby Abbey atop East Cliff

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Whitby Town – view from the top of the 199 Steps

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Caedmon’s Cross and Whitby Town – View from the Churchyard of St.Mary’s 

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Old gravestones in the churchyard – a prominent setting for Bram Stoker’s ‘Dracula’ story.

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A Weathered Gravestone

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By the entrance to the church – Memorial to John Storr, the Coxwain of the Whitby lifeboat, and eleven others who lost their lives on the lifeboat in 1861.

Whitby (11)

A modern day street puppeteer with organ grinder on the Whitby harbour-side

Whitby (12)

 

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WHITBY #2

[ Photo Gallery # 76 ]

A further selection of my photographs of Whitby taken on my frequent visits there  in the past . . .

01 Whitby Panorama

Panoramic view of the entrance from the North Sea to Whitby Harbour and the River Esk

02 Whitby

The Church of St. Mary on the headland on the south bank of the River Esk.   Ruins of the ancient Abbey can be seen behind the church

03 Whitby

View of the inner harbour and the swing bridge crossing the River Esk and connecting the north and south areas of the town.

04 Whitby

View to the east across the inner harbour

05 Whitby

The breakwaters at the Whitby harbour entrance

06 Whitby

Another view of the Whitby Whale Bone Arch

07 Whitby

Bronze statue of Captain James Cook
The inscription reads:
Front: To Strive, to seek to find and not to yield. To commemorate the men who built, the Whitby Ships and the men who sailed with him.
North Side: In every situation he stood unrivalled and alone on him all eyes were turned.

08 WhitbyGulls

. . .  very popular with the local gulls

09 Whitby

A WW2 anti-aircraft gun on the Whitby seafront

10 Whitby

Whitby Harbour entrance

11 Whitby-199Steps

The bottom of the 199 steps in Whitby, leading up to Whitby Abbey and the top of the East Cliff.  These steps are an extraordinary attraction in Whitby, y attracting visitors from all over the world.

12 Whitby

Wood-carved monument to Whitby seamen in the inner harbour

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CORNWALL – the North-East Coast

[  Photograph Gallery   #71  ]

Cornwall’s Coast . . . continued . . .

00 Cornwall-North-Coast

01 StEnodocsChurch1

St. Enodoc’s Church, Trebetherick, Cornwall. The church is said to lie on the site of a cave where Enodoc lived as a hermit.  It is situated among the sand dunes on the eastern bank of the River Camel estuary. Wind-driven sand has formed banks that are almost level with the roof on two sides.  From the 16th century to the middle of the 19th century, the church was virtually buried by the dunes, but by 1864 the church was unearthed and the dunes were stabilized.

02 BetjemansGrave

St. Enodoc’s Church – The grave of Sir John Betjeman.   From his youth Betjeman had come to this particular area of Cornwall.  He went on doing so regularly for the rest of his life.  He eventually moved to live at ‘Treen’, down a quiet lane in the village of Trebetherick, where he died in May 1984. 

03 StEnodocsl-Sep07

St. Enodoc’s Church – the decorated west porch

04 StEnodocsl-Sep07

St. Enodoc’s Church  – the decorated west porch (close-up view)

05 Cornwall-Sep07 Padstow

Harbourside entertainment at Padstow on the River Camel estuary

06 Boscastle-Sep07 020

The view towards Boscastle from where the River Valency meets the sea

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Boscastle harbour and breakwater at the mouth of the River Valency

08 Boscastle-Sep07 010

Boats tied up in the shelter of the stone jetty at Boscastle

 

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The River Valency at Boscastle. Here seen after radical repairs and reconstruction of the river bed and bridge following the hugely destructive floods of  2004. An interesting description of this flood disaster can be read on Wikipedia at:  Boscastle Flood

10 Boscastle-Sep07 016

The Coastguard Station at Boscastle

11 nr Boscastle-Sep07 017

The sea entrance to Boscastle on the River Valancy viewed from the hilltop to the south of the town.

Cornwall – The South-East Coast

[  Photograph Gallery #70  ]

Moving west from the coast of Somerset, which was the subject of my last photographic gallery  ( See –  ‘Coleridge and Watchet’ ), I intend, over the next few weeks, to offer some of the photographs which I have taken in England’s western-most county, Cornwall, mainly in its coastal areas, on my several visits there over the last ten or so years.  I begin today on the south-eastern coast of the county, covering part of the area between Cothele on the border with Devonshire and Fowey (pronounced (Foy).

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Map of the South-East coast of Cornwall

Cornwall (01)Cothele

Calstock and the Viaduct from Cothele House (National Trust)

Cornwall (02)Looe

The Harbour at Looe

Cornwall (03)Polruan

Polruan

Cornwall (04)Polruan

Polruan Siesta

Cornwall (05)Polruan

Polruan – Coastguard Lookout Station

Cornwall (06)RameHead

Rame Head

Cornwall (07)Cawsand

Cawsand

Cornwall (08)MtEdgcumb

At Mount Edgecumb

Cornwall (09)MtEdgcumb

School’s Out – at Mount Edgcumb

Cornwall (10)Fowey

Cottage in Fowey (pronounced ‘Foy’)

Cornwall (11)Torpoint

Old timbers at Tor Point

Cornwall (12)AntonyHse

Ship’s Figurehead at Anthony House

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Coleridge At Watchet

[  Photograph Gallery # 69  ]

Watchet-Map

The harbour town of Watchet lies on the North Somerset coast of England, between the Quantock Hills and the Brendon Hills on the Eastern edge of Exmoor.

The harbour at Watchet is said to have been the inspiration for Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s famous epic poem ‘The Ancient Mariner’.  Whilst on a walk with his friends, William and Dorothy Wordsworth, over the Quantock Hills in 1797 from his home in nearby Nether Stowey, they came upon Watchet.  It has been said that looking down at the town from St. Decuman’s Church in the town gave him the idea for his poem.

‘The ship was cheered, the harbour cleared, 
Merrily did we drop 
Below the kirk, below the hill, 
Below the lighthouse top.’
In 2002 the Watchet Market House Museum Society decided to commemorate the town’s important link with Coleridge by commissioning a statue. A seven-foot high effigy of the mariner was designed and created by sculptor Alan B. Herriot, of Penicuik, Scotland, cast by Powderhall Fine Art Foundries in Edinburgh and unveiled by Dr. Katherine Wyndham in 2003.  This statue now stands overlooking the marina on Watchet Esplanade.
There is now a designated ‘Coleridge Way’ walk of 51 miles through the landscape that inspired Coleridge to produce some of his best known work.  It takes an east to west path from Nether Stowey to Lynmouth through the lovely Somerset countryside of the Quantock Hills, the Brendon Hills and Exmoor – or obviously, in the reverse direction.

My photographs below were taken on a visit to the area in and around Watchet in 2007.

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Watchet 01

Watchet – Harbour & Marina

 

Watchet 02

Looking north-east from Watchet harbour across the Bristol Channel to the island of Steep Holm

Watchet 03

Coleridge’s ‘Ancient Mariner’. created by the Scottish sculptor, Alan Herriot

Watchet 04

‘God save thee, ancient Mariner! 
From the fiends, that plague thee thus! — 
Why look’st thou so?’ — With my cross-bow 
I shot the ALBATROSS..

Watchet 05

(Coleridge) … this renowned poet resided for some years at the nearby village of Nether Stowey.  In 1797, while on a walking tour, Coleridge visited Watchet.  On seeing the harbour he was inspired to compose one of the best known poems in English literature, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’

Watchet 06

While the black-backed gulls keep an eye on events

Watchet 07

Coastal rock striations near Watchet 

Watchet 08

Dead, or just over-wintering?

Dubrovnik … From The City Walls – # 2

[ Photo Blog  #66 ]

I now continue my tour of Dubrovnik with more photographs taken from the superb viewpoint of the magnificent 16th Century walls surrounding the city, during my visit there in 2006.  It is amazing to realise that, only 15 years before my visit, the city had been under siege from invading forces of the Yugoslavian People’s Army during the Croatian War of Independence.

At that time Dubrovnik was a designated UNESCO ‘Protected’ World Heritage Site and the attack on the then besieged city shocked the world.  It had been caught up in the war being fought in the former Yugoslavia.  The military engagement saw the city under siege from both land and sea and constant shelling destroyed many of its ancient baroque buildings and marbled streets.   Many of Dubrovnik’s inhabitants were killed or injured during the bombardments.  Most the buildings in the old town were struck by shells.  The city walls were badly damaged in many places, and its palaces, churches, its monastery and fountains were also badly damaged.

Incredibly, by the time of my visit, Dubrovnik, as you can see from my photographs, had, at a huge cost, been largely restored to something approaching its former glory.

Dubrovnik (1)

Dubrovnik (1a)Dubrovnik (2)Dubrovnik (3)Dubrovnik (4)Dubrovnik (5)Dubrovnik (6)Dubrovnik (7)

Dubrovnik (8)

Dubrovnik (10)

Dubrovnik (11)Dubrovnik (12)

 

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Greenland – Nanortalik #3

For my third and last collection of photographs of this fascinating small coastal town in Greenland, I have eleven miscellaneous photographs from the town and nearby.   The first two are of icebergs and a glacier high up in the mountains viewed on the approach to the town from the sea.  The remaining photographs show views of the town, its harbour, its backdrop of saw-tooth mountains, its proud displaying of the national flag, and of a reconstructed turf house, showing the original homes in which the townsfolk lived . . .

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Bosham Revisited

The village of Bosham (pronounced ‘Bozzam’) in West Sussex is said to be where King Canute, in the early 11th century,  attempted to hold back the waves of the incoming sea.  He did not succeed, as in fact was his purpose in order to demonstrate to his gullible subjects that kings were not all-powerful.  No-one else, either before or after him (barring perhaps Moses) has succeeded either.

I first published an article on this small West Sussex coastal village on the 8th August. Here is a link to it  . . .      Bosham, Sussex, UK

In that blog, one of my very first, I included a number of my photographs of this charming and historic village.  Perhaps the major feature of the village is its delightful waterside setting with the Church of The Holy Trinity dominating the skyline.  I now add below 3 of my panoramic pen and wash sketches, in different styles, of this view from across the waters of the inlet of  Chichester Harbour on which Bosham is situated.

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bosham2

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