Ireland – The Dingle Peninsula

 [ Photo Blog #57 ] 

Following on from the photographs of my visit to Killarney and the Mulcross Estate, today’s tour is of the Dingle Peninsular, one of the 3 promontories which jut out into the Atlantic Ocean from the south-west coast of Ireland.
01.Dingle-Map

Map of South West Ireland showing the Dingle Peninsula

02.Dingle

Beach along the southern coast of the Peninsula

03.Dingle

Further along the southern coast with a view to the outlying islands

04.Dingle

Looking eastwards back towards Dingle

05.Dingle

One of the Dingle Peninsula’s many small secluded beaches

06.Dingle

The Dingle Peninsula has many dozens of standing stones such as this menhir beside the coast road.

07.Dingle

. . .  and this menhir further along the coast

08Dingle

The roadside remains of a one-time occupied croft

09.Dingle

Dingle Slea Head Crucifix – one of many such roadside shrines

10.Dingle

Seagull on the seawall with the Blasket Islands behind

11.Dingle

Sea thrift beside the coast road

12.Dingle-W to the Blasket Isles

Roadside wild foxgloves at the south-western end of the peninsula

bar-green

 

The Touchstone

This poem is inscribed on the  MILLENNIUM  STONE,  the first menhir to be erected on Dartmoor for many years. It stands on the open moor near Princetown, Devon.

The Touchstone

InspiringJohnPowlsJnr-Poem-Touchstone-Dartmoor

This stone touching

Open moor and sky

Granite land mark

Raised to stand

For all times

As one time;

Now, then and ever

In love and beauty

Our story is a book

Always open

At the centre

Half of experiences

Half of

Un-named hopes.

 

Inscribed:

‘John Powls … Poet
AD 2000’

(Poem and inscription submitted by the author)


The fuller explanation printed below is an extract from  the ‘Legendary Dartmoor’ website at:  The Touchstone, Dartmoor

DARTMOOR,  DEVON

. . .  this menhir is probably the first one to be erected on Dartmoor since the Bronze Age. To mark the millennium, John Powls decided it would be a fitting monument to celebrate the new century with and put his idea to the National Park. At the time John Powls was the ‘poet in residence’ with the national park and so he wrote a poem to be inscribed on the stone. The stone was erected on Rundlestone Crest during the summer solstice in 1999. There was then a dedication ceremony held during the winter solstice in December 1999. The stone for the menhir came from the old prison quarry where Powls was the one-time governor and the poem was carved on it by Kevin Andrews of Polzeath in Cornwall. The touchstone stands at a proud 2 metres from the ground.