Cricket, Love & Easter

Three RICTAMETERS

Rictameter is a fixed-syllabic poetry form, similar to the Haiku and the Cinquain   ( Click here See my own cinquain in an earlier blog.  ).  The rictameter starts with a two-syllable word as the first line.  Then the line length in syllables is consecutively increased by two, i.e. 2, 4, 6, 8, 10.  Then down again, from 8, 6, 4, 2.   The final of the 9 lines is required to be the same two syllable word as in the opening line.

The format was created in the early 1990s by two cousins, Jason Wilkins and Richard Lunsford, for a poetry contest that was held as a weekly practice of their self-invented order, ‘The Brotherhood of the Amarantos Mystery’, which was apparently inspired by the Robin Williams film ‘Dead Poet’s Society’.

I have attempted three versions of this format below . . .


CRICKET

Cricket
Keep a straight bat
All that they throw at you
Face up to it with fortitude
Don’t be average be an all-rounder
And when it’s time to pull up stumps
Try to carry your bat
Don’t declare, that’s
Cricket.

LOVE

Love hurts
It burns the soul
From lust to jealousy
It does not let up from that pain
So put alongside with its times of bliss
The memories of anguished dread
When all seemed to be dead
All reason says
Love hurts.

crossEASTER

Absolve
The human race
Release them from their sins
Forgive them their indiscretions
Instead torment me on that cruel cross
That I might thus remind them all
That God our father loves
And all our sins
Absolves.

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CHERITA

I have been experimenting with the poetic form – The CHERITA . . .

Cherita’ is the Malay word for story or tale. A cherita consists of a single stanza of a one-line verse, followed by a two-line verse, and then finishing with a three-line verse. It can be written solo or with up to three partners.  (See the website at:   https://www.thecherita.com for further information).

Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

1.

A letter arrives.

Hope stirs;
Is it from her?

Addressed to:
‘The householder’.
One more disappointment.

Just A Dribble

Bottom we see in ‘Midsummer’s Dream’

He carried a good deal of fat

If it were me I think I would scream


Can’t say fairer than that!


The DRIBBLE is a short poetic form consisting of exactly 100 letters (not 100 characters – spaces and punctuation are not counted.  Dribbles usually take the form of a quatrain with a rhyme scheme of abab.

  Any subject is acceptable, though it is normally based on a mundane or unconventional subject, but like the haiku or sonnet, some modern poets adhere only to the counting aspect of the form.  

Because of the brevity of the form, the title of a dribble is often an integral part of the poem, but its letters are not counted against the total.  

The name of the dribble is derived from the micro-fiction form known as the drabble, a story consisting of exactly 100 words.

For what it is worth, my own first attempt is given above . . .

JUNE – A Nonet

nonet

As regular readers of Roland’s Ragbag will know, from time to time, I attempt a poem in a form which I have not previously tried.  Today I publish below my attempt at a NONET . . .

A NONET –  has nine lines. The first line has nine syllables, the second line eight syllables, the third line seven syllables, etc … until line nine finishes with one syllable. It can be on any subject and rhyming is optional.  Sometimes printed as a -right angled triangle , at other times as a Pyramid – as below.

See:   Shadow Poetry  on the Nonet.


[ N.B.  Wikipedia gives the spelling as ‘Nonnet’.  Both forms seem to be acceptable ] 

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June

 

Five months of the year have been and gone 

More of my life has now passed on

Pinch punch the first of the month

And June is here with smiles

Time for summer styles

For life and love

Here on earth

Rebirth

Worth

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