The Quinzaine

After my attempt at a cinquaine in a recent blog, I turn to another verse form, sounding rather similar but conforming to a different set of rules.

A Quinzaine is an un-rhymed verse of fifteen syllables. The word comes from the French word quinze, meaning fifteen. The syllables are distributed over three lines so that there are seven syllables in the first line, five in the second line, and three in the third line (7/5/3). The first line makes a statement. The next two lines ask a question relating to that statement. From: Wikipedia).

Below are 4 of my attempts at a quinzaine, each related to one of my own photographs 

Cardiff Waterfront

Look! The sun is coming out
Isn’t it home time?
Dog: Food time?

Watchet Harbourside, Somerset

I just shot an albatross
Does that mean bad luck?
Isn’t life short?

Funeral Urn – Churchyard, Surrey

Resting place for my ashes
Will I end up there?
Who can tell?

Stone Owl – Yorkshire

The owl is a wise old bird
Does a stone one count?
Can he hoot?

Stay With Me … A VILLANELLE

‘The Heart Of The Rose’ … Edward Coley Burne-Jones … Oil on canvas – 1889

A  VILLANELLE

Stay with me to the end of time
Relive with me those joys now past
I want you always to be mine

To be together is no crime
It’s not for nothing I have asked
Stay with me to the end of time

You are my life’s eternal sunshine
To you I will remain steadfast
I want you always to be mine

This poetry for you I rhyme
With you alone I’m not downcast
Stay with me to the end of time

For you alone I give a lifetime
Our love will life itself outlast
I want you always to be mine

To heights of wonder we will climb
And when we reach the top I ask
Stay with me to the end of time
I want you always to be mine

VILLANELLE

A Villanelle is a nineteen-line poem consisting of a very specific rhyming scheme:
 aba      aba      aba      aba      aba      abaa.

The poem’s format is also strictly regulated.  The first and the third lines in the first stanza are repeated in alternating order throughout the poem, and appear together in the last couplet (last two lines).    

One of the most famous Villanelles is “Do not go Gentle into that Good Night” by Dylan Thomas

Notes quoted from:  ‘SHADOW POETRY’ @ . . .   SHADOW POETRY

Telling FIBS

Search for ‘Pine Cones & the Fibonacciri Sequence’

TELLING  FIBS

This
Life
Is short
Remember
Honest and modest
You’re not in a beauty contest.

So
When
I’m gone
Do not pray
For my godliness
Just remember my gentleness.

If
I
Survive
To be old
One hundred and five
I hope it’s worth being alive.

But
It
Only
Merits it
If you are still there
To continue our love affair.

I am grateful to M.Zane McClellan who in his January 2016 poem  ‘Repeating Pattern’  on The Poetry Channel, introduced me to The format of the Fibonacci Poem. He also gave in his blog the reference to the article on the ‘Poetry Foundation’ website, which gives the history of this fascinating verse format:  What’s a Fib? Math plus poetry.

Essentially the ‘Fib’, as it’s creator, Gregory K. Pincus, calls it, will have 20 syllables in total, with the syllables in each of the 6 lines increasing in the Fibonacci sequence familiar in Mathematics and in Nature, that is: 1,1,2,3,5,8…  ,

In my first attempt at this format, I have attempted to write a poem of 4 connected verses, with the added feature of making the last two lines in each verse rhyme.

SENRYU #3: Friendship

Continuing my own experimentations with a variety of different verse forms, here is my further attempt at a SENRYU . . .

Photo by mododeolhar on Pexels.com

Senryū is a Japanese form of short poetry similar to haiku in construction: three lines with 17 morae (syllables). Senryū tend to be about human foibles while haiku tend to be about nature, and senryū are often cynical or darkly humorous while haiku are more serious. Wikipedia

FRIENDSHIP

Rejoice in friendship
Brotherly love always wins
Over self and pride.

SENRYU #2: Success

Senryū is a Japanese form of short poetry similar to haiku in construction: three lines with 17 morae (syllables). Senryū tend to be about human foibles while haiku tend to be about nature, and senryū are often cynical or darkly humorous while haiku are more serious. Wikipedia

Continuing my own experimentations with a variety of different verse forms, here is my second attempt at a SENRYU . . .

SUCCESS

A fear of failure
Stifles resolve and stunts growth.
Face up to success.

SENRYU #1: Freedom

Continuing my own experimentations with a variety of different verse forms, here is attempt at a SENRYU . . .

Senryū is a Japanese form of short poetry similar to haiku in construction: three lines with 17 morae (syllables). Senryū tend to be about human foibles while haiku tend to be about nature, and senryū are often cynical or darkly humorous while haiku are more serious. Wikipedia

FREEDOM

Longing for release
Knowing how Bonivar felt
I await freedom

N. B. Bonivar was the ‘The Prisoner of Chillon’. ‘The Prisoner of Chillon’ is a 392-line narrative poem by Lord Byron. Written in 1816, it chronicles the imprisonment of a Genevois monk, François Bonivard, from 1532 to 1536. Wikipedia

Telling More Fibs

Fibonacci poetry, or FIB VERSE, was founded by Gregory K. Pincus as a 6-line poem that follows the Fibonacci sequence for syllable count per line.
For the 6-line poem that means:

1 syllable for first line
1 syllable for second line
2 syllables for third
3 syllables for fourth
5 syllables for fifth
8 syllables for sixth


*****

Here are two more examples of my own attempts to compose FIB VERSE . . .

( I have published previous examples of FIB VERSE which you can find by typing ‘Fibs’ into the SEARCH BAR on this blog’ )

TELLING FIBS … #3. CARPE DIEM
Here
Now
Today
Grasp the chance
Say ‘Carpe Diem’
Seize this new day with fortitude

TELLING FIBS…. #4
Look
Learn
Be wise
Hold to Truth
Never embroider
For the truth will bring you freedom



Dribble Verse #3: Contractions

WHB: Pen & Crayon – 2021

Continuing my, for fun, experimentations with newer verse forms, here is my third attempt at DRIBBLE VERSE.

The dribble is a brief poem consisting of exactly 100 letters (not 100 characters—spaces and punctuation are not counted).  Dribbles most often take the form of a quatrain that turns on a single rhyme and usually provide a humorous observation on a mundane or unconventional subject, but like the haiku or sonnet, some modern poets adhere only to the counting aspect of the form  . . . The name of the dribble is derived from the micro-fiction form known as the drabble, a story consisting of exactly 100 words. Rhyme scheme: abab
From:  https://poetscollective.org/poetryforms/dribble/

Dribble # 1: Contractions


‘I wouldn’t, I didn’t, I couldn’t’, (22)
I shouted in wild distraction. (25)
I knew that I really shouldn’t, (24)
Because they are all contractions. (29)

The numbers in brackets represent the number of letters in each line -totallin100 ]




Dribble Verse #2: Methuselah

WHB: Pen & Crayon – 2021

Continuing my, for fun, experimentations with newer verse forms, here is my second attempt at DRIBBLE VERSE.

The dribble is a brief poem consisting of exactly 100 letters (not 100 characters—spaces and punctuation are not counted).  Dribbles most often take the form of a quatrain that turns on a single rhyme and usually provide a humorous observation on a mundane or unconventional subject, but like the haiku or sonnet, some modern poets adhere only to the counting aspect of the form  . . . The name of the dribble is derived from the micro-fiction form known as the drabble, a story consisting of exactly 100 words. Rhyme scheme: abab
From:  https://poetscollective.org/poetryforms/dribble/

Dribble # 2: Methuselah

Methusaleh died at a ripe old age, (27)
Nine hundred and sixty nine. (23)
I read he died in a filthy rage, (24)
Incensed he’d got a parking fine. (26)

The numbers in brackets represent the number of letters in each line -totalling 100 ]

Dribble Verse #1: Her Crowning Glory

WHB: Pen & Crayon – 2021

Continuing my, for fun, experimentations with newer verse forms, her is my first attempt at DRIBBLE VERSE.

The dribble is a brief poem consisting of exactly 100 letters (not 100 characters—spaces and punctuation are not counted).  Dribbles most often take the form of a quatrain that turns on a single rhyme and usually provide a humorous observation on a mundane or unconventional subject, but like the haiku or sonnet, some modern poets adhere only to the counting aspect of the form  . . . The name of the dribble is derived from the micro-fiction form known as the drabble, a story consisting of exactly 100 words. Rhyme scheme: abab
From:  https://poetscollective.org/poetryforms/dribble/

Dribble # 1: Her Crowning Glory

I tell of a lady, sweetly fair, (23)
tall and stout, in fact quite big. (26)
Her crowning glory was her hair, (26)
But looked at close it was a wig. (25)

[ The numbers in brackets represent the number of letters in each line -totalling 100 ]