Goodbye – Two Word Tale #12

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Photo by Shawnna Donop from Pexels

GOODBYE

At last
It’s here
Stand fast
No fear

Ship ahoy
Let rip
En-joy
Your trip

Be-ware
Don’t dare
Take care
Play fair

Bon chance
Toodle-oo
Good luck
See you!

Pip pip
In-deed
You’re off
God speed!

 

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“I Would Live In Your Love” … Sara Teasdale

[  # 93 of My Favourite Short Poems  ]

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I Would Live In Your Love – Sara Teasdale

I would  live in your love

As the sea-grasses live in the sea,

Borne up by each wave as it passes,

Drawn down by each wave that recedes;

I would empty my soul

Of the dreams that have gathered in me

I would beat with your heart as it beats,

I would follow your soul as it leads.

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A gentle love poem by the American lyric poet, Sara Teasdale (1884-1933).  After her marriage in 1914, she used the name Sara Teasdale Filsinger.  As the sea-grass lives in and is sustained by the sea, so the poet wishes her life to be consumed and given wholly to her love. The images created belie her own love story when it would appear that she married largely to meet with the wishes of her parents.  The marriage ended in divorce in 1929 and just four years later Sarah was found dead in her bath.  Although denied at the time, it is believed that the death was suicide.
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Rainer Maria Rilke – ‘The Swan’

(No.66 of my favourite short poems)

Swan

‘The Swan’ – WHB Pen & Wash – 2017

The Swan

This labouring of ours with all that remains undone, 
as if still bound to it, 
is like the lumbering gait of the swan. 

And then our dying—releasing ourselves 
from the very ground on which we stood— 
is like the way he hesitantly lowers himself 

into the water. It gently receives him, 
and, gladly yielding, flows back beneath him, 
as wave follows wave, 
while he, now wholly serene and sure, 
with regal composure, 
allows himself to glide. 

 

By RAINER MARIA RILKE
… Translation from the German by Joanna Macy and Anita Barrows

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I have previously commented on one of Rilke’s poem ‘The Panther’ (q.v.).  In this poem, The Swan’, Rilke connects the awkward way the swan has of moving on land with its smooth, gliding motions as soon as it enters the water.  It is then, with forthright simile, he references the move for the swan, as for we human beings, from the uncertainties and incomplete nature of our lives to a calm acceptance of death.  This seems to me to present a positive view of what death can bring, with the release from earthly tensions into the calm and sure serenity of the after life.

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